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yakiudon1984 commented on a post in r/japan
dokool 15 points

I'm wondering if I need a visa for this or can do it without.

If you aren't receiving any money for your appearance (this includes selling merch), you are allowed to come to Japan and volunteer your time performing for free. Anything beyond that and you definitely need a visa.

We'll likely make a little bit of money from tickets and shirts, but not much.

Showing up at the airport with a bunch of instruments and a suitcase full of shirts is a one-way street to being interrogated by a couple angry immigration officials and possibly getting tossed onto the next return flight.

What I've found so far about artist visas seems to suggest that it's difficult and for bigger acts.

That is correct.

Any suggestion?

Your expat friend who booked you should have done the legwork on this, not you. I'd be a bit worried. Good luck!

yakiudon1984 5 points

If you aren't receiving any money for your appearance (this includes selling merch), you are allowed to come to Japan and volunteer your time performing for free.

Not necessarily. Any work (even for free), that could possibly take away or displace the job of a Japanese (even working for free), may need a visa.

There are past examples, listed to this subreddit, of people being busted for "working / performing / volunteering for free" (ie. volunteer interpreter services) on a temp-landing permit.

They take a hard line on this because they know the loophole: the performer will often claim they are performing for free, but are in fact getting paid before or after-the-fact for their work in their home country electronically.

This doesn't just apply to Japan, by the way. Go Google up some YouTube video of "Border Security: Australia's Front Line" or the Canadian variation of the show for some real life examples of "performers/workers busted for trying to perform for 'free' or volunteer work overseas."

Now... the reality is that for most low profile and casual "entertaining", they will probably look the other way and/or fly under the radar. Having merchandise or lots of gear etc in your suitcase, however, as their parent comment mentions, is a very good way to get ON immigration's radar.

Just wanted to pedantically point out that work/entertaining/volunteering doesn't-require-a-visa if it's "volunteer" or for "free" is not entirely true. In Japan or elsewhere.

SoKratez 108 points

"Let's take a small sample of elite professionals, generalize all of Americans based on that, and tie it back to how actually the Japanese way of doing things was right all along."

Hey I think I've got a idea for a Japanese TV show.

yakiudon1984 13 points

It is actually backed up by OECD data. Americans do work more hours than Japanese (and are above average in actual hours worked):

US News: This Labor Day Weekend, a Look at the Hardest-Working Countries

FatChocobo 35 points

The thing is, the Americans working overtime are probably being paid for it, whereas the Japanese who work overtime don't record it so that their gracious employer doesn't have to pay them.

yakiudon1984 2 points

Americans working overtime are probably being paid for it

Actually, they often aren't:

https://www.facebook.com/traecrowder/videos/1626793467356106/

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Sanngetall 13 points

Going by 244 work days over the year this would round up to just over 7 hours a day, which means that there is a lot of people doing part time jobs which skewers the chart, and there's a lot of unreported overtime (which is true!)

yakiudon1984 1 point

And this is unique to Japan, and happens in no other OECD countries?

Sanngetall 8 points

I would not say it's unique to Japan but it's definitely more prevalent. It's also easier to underreport work hours in Japan as opposed to many European countries which have stricter laws against exploitation of workers.

I also wonder how 見込み残業 is worked into the report. If someone has 30 hours per month as expected overtime but actually does 40-60, is his work contribution calculated as 30 hours or are his actual hours reported?

Last but not least the prevalence of mandatory company outings (nomikai) in Japanese work culture is adds extra 2-4 hours to many workers' "work hours" but they would not be counted in OECD reports.

But as someone mentioned in another thread, part timers are also counted and the traditional family structure of Japan easily increases the amount of part timers and reduces the number of full time workers, further skewing the chart.

yakiudon1984 -1 points

I would not say it's unique to Japan but it's definitely more prevalent. It's also easier to underreport work hours in Japan as opposed to many European countries which have stricter laws against exploitation of workers.

Source please.

European countries which have stricter laws against exploitation of workers.

Funny enough, the majority of countries with the highest amount of hours worked are (eastern) European countries according to this data.

Hitomi_chan 2 points

I mean, you can be facetious, but the advice says " we recommend this with no evidence because it stops large droplets possibly" , you're just choosing not to read it this way.

yakiudon1984 1 point

You should submit an article to the CDC, titled "Masks are useless for the flu and a waste of time and money. Here's why." as a rebuttal. Please do post the URL of the official CDC.gov link when published.

Hitomi_chan 2 points

Actually my position is "surgical masks worn in public are probably at best mildly helpful (and for many reasons may not be) and the science does not definitively give us an answer, but if youre sick limiting droplet transmission is a good thing to do" which , again, is exactly what the article says.

Elsewhere in this thread I've linked a systemic review which shows that the science is weakest for masks preventing flu AQUISITION, which is how most Japanese use them.

yakiudon1984 1 point

... preventing flu AQUISITION, which is how most Japanese use them.

No, the opposite. Few people in Japan wear a mask when they don't think they have a cold etc.

Unless it's for allergies or a no makeup day.

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yakiudon1984 commented on a post in r/japan
pissygaijin 7 points

That seems unlikely, though I'm pretty sure that most "Japanese" restaurants in the US are owned by Chinese.

Source: been to lots of restaurants in the US and Japan.

yakiudon1984 7 points

There's a reason for this: profit.

Chinese food is considered to be "cheap", whereas you have much higher profit margins for Japanese cuisine, which is considered "expensive" and people will pay a premium for it. (even if it's "fake" Japanese food... like Americanized Lo Mein relabeled as Japanese)

Source: Why so many of America’s sushi restaurants are owned by Chinese immigrants -- Washington Post

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